Photo of Taylor Bollt

Taylor Bollt is an associate in Henderson Franklin's Land Use & Environmental Department. He is based out of the firm’s Naples office and will work alongside his mentor and department chair, Jeff Wright.

Taylor always knew he wanted to be a part of an organization that served the community. His vision for his practice is to create a lasting impact in the region by assisting in its growth and development. He entered the legal world as a Legislative Aid for a County Commissioner in Hillsborough County. This experience introduced Taylor to the complexity of financial planning for a community, the enforcement of codes and regulations, and the issues that affect land development.

Taylor attained his undergraduate degree at the University of Tampa, where he majored in Political Science and minored in Public Speaking. While achieving his Juris Doctorate from Stetson University College of Law, Taylor was honored to serve as Team Captain for a team of law students in a dispute resolution competition. His peers selected him for his strong negotiation skills and articulate speech.

Taylor is a native of Southwest Florida and grew up in Naples.

Professional and Civic Affiliations

Taylor is a member of the Collier County Bar Association.

Lee County 50% Rule Changes To follow-up on my previous post, on November 8, the Lee County Commissioners considered several changes to facilitate repairs to buildings damaged by Hurricane Ian. The most significant changes involve how the “50% Rule” will be calculated.

The calculations for the 50% Rule along with other guidelines relating to the 50% rule are based on local regulation. Lee County Board of Commissioners were presented with and approved the following changes:

  • Allowing for a “permit-by-permit” valuation of the cost of repairs. The past County regulations required a cumulative consideration of improvements made over the previous 5 years. This change would not apply to “repetitive loss” properties that have received two or more NFIP payouts in excess of $1000 over a 10-year period.
  • Amending cumulative period for “repetitive loss” properties from 5 years to 1 year for 50% calculation.
  • Updating elevation requirements for manufactured homes in special flood hazard areas and coastal high hazard areas.
  • Amendment reflecting that the newest version of FEMA flood insurance rate maps for Lee County take effect November, 17, 2022.


Continue Reading Outcome of November 8 Lee County’s Meeting Regarding 50% Rule for Hurricane Ian Repairs

At its upcoming Special Meeting on November 8, the Lee County Commission will consider several changes to facilitate repairs to buildings damaged by Hurricane Ian.  The Local Planning Agency (LPA) will consider and make a recommendation on the proposed changes at its meeting on November 7.

The most significant changes involve how the “50% Rule” will be calculated.  The 50% Rule, required by FEMA as part of the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP), states that repairs to damaged structures cannot exceed 50% of the value of the building unless the structure is brought into full compliance with current flood regulations, including minimum finished floor elevations.

Continue Reading Lee County to Consider Changes to 50% Rule to Facilitate Hurricane Ian Repairs

short term rentalsSouthwest Florida is a prime location for people to bring their family and friends to vacation. Whether it’s the golf, beaches, or just the beautiful weather, Southwest Florida has solidified itself as a great destination for vacations. This has made tourism a major industry, and one of the biggest areas of tourism is hotels and rentals for families staying in the area.

However, in recent years families have been more inclined to try to rent a home for a short period rather than booking a hotel room. According to Section 509.013(4)(a)(1.) of Florida Statutes, a short-term rental is defined as a residence rented for less than thirty days and rented out more than three times a year.

With the rise of the vacation rental industry, local governments and their residents have seen the impacts they have on the community. This led to two major questions – how can local governments regulate these short-term rentals or how can they prohibit them?

History of Short-Term Rentals

Vacation rentals have always been popular but were not always readily available or easy to find. A revolution occurred in the early 2000s with the rise of the internet and along with that came online rental platforms. Now there are many different platforms, such as Airbnb and VRBO, which made short-term rentals much more available. Further, this led to an overall increase in the number of rentals available.

This increase in rentals led to issues amongst local governments and their citizens because of the impacts short-term rentals had on the community, both positive and negative. Local governments began to ban or create regulations around these short-term rentals. Because of the divide and lack of consistency in regulation by local governments, the Florida legislature created a law that prohibited any local government from banning short-term rentals and limited how they may be regulated.

Effect of the New Legislation


Continue Reading Can Your Local Government Ban Short Term Vacation Rentals?

As a result of Hurricane Ian, permits and development orders may qualify for an extension. According to Florida Statute § 252.363, when a governor declares a state of emergency permits can be extended for the duration of the state of emergency. Additionally, permits will be extended six months after the state of emergency expires.

Executive Order 22-218, which declared a state of emergency, was made effective on September 23rd, 2022, and if it is not extended, it will expire 60 days after its announcement, which is November 22nd, 2022.

First, it is important to note which counties are affected by this state of emergency. Initially, Executive Order 22-218 declared a state of emergency for a list of specific counties. But, on September 24th, 2022 Governor Desantis issued Executive Order 22-219 expanding the state of emergency from the specific counties originally listed to the entire state of Florida.

Continue Reading Due to Hurricane Ian, Florida development orders and permits qualify for extensions