"Division of Florida Condominiums"

During the COVID-19 pandemic, most of us have been forced to incorporate greater use of technology to conduct our business. For many associations, some tasks have been done for the first time using electronic technologies, such as video meetings under the exceptions permitted by the board’s emergency powers.

Conducting business by electronic means can increase efficiency and save paper, money, and storage space. Now that we are all getting used to conducting more business solely by solely electronic means, boards and managers may be wondering what they can do under the law to continue to use technology to operate their associations under “normal” circumstances. Here are some reminders of what is permitted under the Florida Statutes.

Meeting Notices

E-mail can be used to provide meeting notices only for owners who have consented in writing to accept notices by electronic means and who have provided an email address for that purpose. Meeting notices must also still be posted in a conspicuous place on the property if otherwise required. In addition to mailing, hand delivering or e-mailing notices, an association may adopt a procedure for conspicuously posting and repeatedly broadcasting the notice and agenda on a closed-circuit cable television system serving the association. If used, the broadcast notice and agenda must be broadcast in a manner and sufficient length of time so as to allow an average reader to observe, read and comprehend the entire content.

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Continue Reading Incorporating Electronic Technology Into Association Operations

Digital Online Vote Democracy Politcs Election Government ConcepOn October 26, 2015, the Division of Florida Condominiums, Timeshares, and Mobile Homes approved a proposed rule to amend and supplement the Florida Administrative Code provisions regarding condominium associations’ voting and elections. The proposed rule provides condominium associations with the option to allow the unit owners to vote using an online system, as an alternative to the traditional paper ballots.

While the language of the rule may change before it becomes final, as it stands, the following must occur before a condominium association may utilize an online voting system:


Continue Reading Condominium Association – Requirements to Conduct Electronic Vote

As seems to be the trend with amendments to Chapter 720, Florida Statutes, which governs residential homeowners’ associations, the 2013 legislation increases regulation by the Division of Florida Condominiums, Timeshares and Mobile Homes (the “Division”) of residential homeowners’ associations. Specifically, the association manager, management firm, or the association is now required to submit a report

Closer Look at contract.jpgMy colleague, Sharon Zuccaro, previously blogged about Tips to Avoid Common Mistakes on Florida Homeowner Association (“HOA”) Disclosures. As Sharon pointed out, sellers of homes within HOAs are not required to deliver copies of the HOA’s governing documents to purchasers, but are required to provide a Disclosure form. The Condominium Act provides different disclosure requirements for non-developer sellers of condominium units.

Disclosure Required

The buyer of a condominium unit from an individual is entitled to receive copies of certain governing documents at the seller’s expense, if the buyer so requests in writing.  If such request is made, the buyer may cancel the contract for the sale of a condominium unit within 3 days, excluding Saturdays, Sundays and legal holidays after the contract was executed by the buyer and the buyer has received a current copy of the declaration of condominium, articles of incorporation, bylaws, and rules of the association, a copy of the most recent year-end financial report and frequently asked questions and answers document, and a copy of the condominium governance form prepared by the Division of Florida Condominiums, Timeshares and Mobile Homes.


Continue Reading Required Disclosures to Buyers of Resale Condominium Units in Florida