Under Florida law, a landlord has a statutory right to demand double rent from a tenant when the tenant refuses or fails to give up possession of leased premises at the end of the lease term. § 83.06(1), Florida Statutes. When a tenant holds over past the expiration of the lease, then the tenancy becomes a tenancy at sufferance and the tenant is considered a holdover tenant. However, a landlord is not automatically entitled to double rent from a holdover tenant until the landlord demands double rent from the tenant, even if the lease provides for it. If landlord does not demand upon tenant, then the tenant is only required to continue paying the original rental rate.

Failure to Vacate

These rules were illustrated in Lincoln Oldsmobile, Inc. v. Branch, 574 So.2d 1111 (Fla. 2d DCA 1990) (“Lincoln”). In Lincoln, the tenant, Bob Lincoln, Inc., failed to vacate property owned by landlord, William Branch and Roger Dean (collectively, “Branch”), after Branch refused to grant Lincoln a short lease extension to allow for construction of Lincoln’s new facility.


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