florida-1624651_640Have you ever wondered whether renting out your property using VRBO qualifies as a commercial use as opposed to a residential use? You’re not alone.

On one hand, earning income from rent, advertising for new tenants, managing and scheduling those tenants, and maintaining the property to comply with the regulations required to frequently rent out your property for short periods certainly sounds like a business.

On the other hand, it’s your residence, and the people paying you to stay in it are only using it to eat, sleep, and do other ordinary acts incident to living. They aren’t using your place to produce income for themselves.

While both sides seem to have a reasonable argument, a recent Florida appellate court decided that renting a home to someone who uses the home “for ordinary living purposes such as sleeping and eating” qualified as a residential use under that particular association’s governing documents. See, Santa Monica Beach Property Owners Association v. Acord, (Fla. App., 2017).

What is the Legal Scoop?


Continue Reading Renting Your Home Using VRBO is a Residential Use

We all understand the value of preparing for hurricane season, but what about tourist season?

In the last post, we talked about the need for a license if you intend to rent your property out on short term intervals.

Now that you know whether you need a license to rent out your second home or condo, have you considered the benefits of using a written rental agreement?

Sure, it’s convenient and friendly to allow a stranger on VRBO to rent your property and only require that he or she pay a modest security deposit up front. In a perfect world, the renter would pay rent, not damage the property, follow all of the rules, and this arrangement would work out wonderfully every time.

Benefits of a Written Rental Agreement


Continue Reading Vacation Rentals: Are You Prepared?

IMG_3202Relatively recently, sites like VRBO have revolutionized how people travel. They also have made it easier for the average person to rent out their home without the need for professional assistance.

Are you considering renting your second home or condo during this fast-approaching Southwest Florida tourism season? If so, have you considered that you might be fined if you don’t have a license?

What You Need To Know

Florida law requires anyone in Florida renting a home to guests more than three times a year for stays which are less than 30 days to have a license. This means most of the people listing their homes on VRBO or otherwise advertising their house as available for rent to the public need to get a license from the DBPR- Division of Hotels and Restaurants.
Continue Reading What You Need to Know if You Are Considering Signing Up with VBRO