Mortgage contractI find myself frequently having conversations with potential clients asking why they shouldn’t use a title company to handle the closing of their new home. Why spend more money to hire an attorney when a title company can close the deal for less? Excellent question.

Sure, a title company can create the documents necessary to close the deal. They can also generally guide the parties on some issues that might come up, such as what additional requirements must be met when the seller is considered a “foreign person” under FIRPTA.


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Foreclosure Nick Bastian FlickrOn August 24, 2016, the Fourth District Court of Appeal issued an opinion in Ober v. Town of Lauderdale-by-the-Sea, No. 4D14-4597, 2016 WL 4468134 (Fla. 4th DCA August 24, 2016) that is likely to have broad implications on Florida’s foreclosure process and negatively impact investor interests in distressed real estate. Moving forward, from a land use perspective, the case should also serve as a cautionary tale and reminder about the importance of a prospective buyer’s due diligence.

Background

The genesis of the case began on November 26, 2007, when a lis pendens was recorded on a property as part of a foreclosure proceeding against a homeowner. Thereafter, a bank obtained a final judgment of foreclosure on the property in September of 2008. Several years following the final judgment, a real estate investor, Ober, purchased the property on September 27, 2012 at a judicial sale.

The crux of the case revolved around seven (7) separate code enforcement liens that had been recorded on the property by the Town between the dates of July 13, 2009 and October 27, 2011, all stemming from violations that occurred after the final judgment was entered. Finally, in 2013 the Town began to impose three more liens on the property in relation to the earlier violations.

In an attempt to strike the liens against his property, Ober filed an action to quiet title in civil court. In response, the Town filed counterclaims to foreclose the ten (10) liens, which were later approved by the trial court in its final judgment that was entered against Ober.

According to the Ober Court, Florida’s Lis Pendens Statute Does Not Apply to Liens Recorded Between Final Judgment and the Judicial Sale


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The term “due diligence” gets thrown around a lot in the development world, but often with little regard for what the term entails. As with all things relating to property, this post is in no way intended to encompass all considerations in due diligence as properties are unique and present specific needs of review. However, the following list provides a brief glimpse into items to review when you are considering the purchase of real property for development in Southwest Florida:
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sold flickr MarkMoz12Selling or buying a home within an association may not be as simple as buyer offers and seller accepts.

In Florida, condominium and homeowners’ associations may require potential buyers to submit an application to the association before allowing the buyer to close on the property. A buyer’s failure to timely submit an application to a

Mortgage contractIn April of last year, David Fowler shared a post about a seller’s obligation in a residential sale to disclose facts or conditions about the property that have a substantial impact on its value or desirability, and that are not easily observable to a buyer. As the post outlined, most of the disclosures are property specific, like the presence of mold or wood destroying organisms, or whether essential components of the home, such as the roof, plumbing or HVAC, are in disrepair. Sellers typically inform buyers of these conditions in a disclosure form usually provided by the seller’s real estate agent. There are, however, other disclosures required by Florida law that are equally as important to a buyer in making an informed decision whether to purchase a home.

Here are some of those disclosures that parties involved in the sale of a residential home should also be aware of:

Homeowners Association and Condominium Association


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contract flickr MarkMoz12Lawsuits regarding nondisclosure of a home’s problems are becoming more prevalent. Historically, the rule of “caveat emptor” or “buyer beware” was the prevailing standard in residential transactions. However, the law has evolved and Florida now requires sellers of residential property to make certain disclosures to buyers about the property’s condition and history. An increasing number

ContractsAs a real estate lawyer, a significant part of my practice involves preparing and negotiating commercial and residential lease agreements. At times, however, potential clients may decide to find a sample lease agreement online, or have their realtor prepare the lease, to avoid attorney fees.

Proceed With Caution

Because most commercial leases are for 5,

10.jpgLast month I wrote about the importance of due diligence before a contract is signed when purchasing commercial property. This month’s article discusses a buyer’s due diligence after the contract has been signed but prior to closing and taking title to the property.

As stated in last month’s article, a buyer must perform due diligence

10.jpgA good portion of my practice involves representing buyers in commercial and residential transactions. Part of this representation involves advising my clients on due diligence matters pertaining to the property. Most of us know investigation of various real property matters is critical before purchasing commercial real estate. Do you also know your due diligence of